Hurricane Human Goodness vs. Christ’s Work

Dear Fellow Pastors and Believers,


Here is a golden opportunity.

It is true that emotions run high. It is true that everyone from atheistic liberalism to the politically right-wing occult is swept up in the great tide of philanthropic sentimentalism and volunteerism. It is true that humanism will exult itself as it always does in crises like these, making the claim that human nobility will outlive and outgive whatever “Mother Nature” hurls its way. It is also frightfully true that even the plowing of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord, and therefore Hurricane Human Goodness will wreak more long-term damage than Katrina.

Ironically, the Christian answer to Hurricane Human Goodness is to be good — good in a Christ-centered, Christ-focused, Christ-governed way. We believe King Jesus ordered the storm. His scepter of holiness has been lifted, and from His glorious Throne of Sovereignty the storm was decreed.

We concur with the 19th century Baptist theologian J.L. Dagg, who said, “The Scriptures not only attribute events to the overruling hand of God, but they represent him as ordering them for the accomplishment of some purpose.” We heartily endorse theologian Robert Reymond’s assertion:

Creation “was intended as the stage on which God’s redemptive design is enacted and fulfilled; it was not intended to provide the speculative mind with neutral data on the basis of which the unbeliever may conclude that some undefined entity possibly lies behind it…. Creation’s raison d’être then is to serve the redemptive ends of God.”

T.H.L. Parker said,

“We must resist the temptation to think about providence generally and independently of Christ. It would be possible to draw on certain Psalms and the Sermon on the Mount, for example, to make up a doctrine of God’s relationship to his creation that had nothing to do with Jesus Christ. But since it is in Christ that this relationship is established, an attempt to understand it apart from him would be a misinterpretation from the start. In Jesus Christ, God has set up the relationship between himself and his creatures, promising to carry through his purpose in creation to its triumphal end.”

And Reymond, who quoted Parker, added:

“I whole heartedly concur with Parker, and would submit that one must never sever any aspect of God’s providence away from the en Christo relationship that exists between God and his creation, since all of God’s dealings with his creation are mediated through the Christ.”

In other words, Katrina is Christ’s work. His work is necessarily Christological; therefore our response should be in keeping with His covenanted purpose.

opening our arms and our homes for the Gospel's sakeWe at Morning Star are on a mission. Our mission is to rescue families from the devastated areas and deliver them to the keeping of local churches who faithfully preach the Word of God. In other words, this is pure “stranger love,” the love that we are commanded to exercise in the New Testament, the Word of Christ. The particular Greek work that the Holy Spirit selected for our English word “hospitality” is literally “stranger love.” We are hoping to find families, starting in the household of faith, who are willing to move. We will take them in as a church, find jobs, find homes, and provide startup, including the free move across the country. If many churches like ours would follow our example by adopting a family we would make a great impact for the cause of Christ our Lord.

Please pray for Mark Garard and myself as we travel down to this needy area. Support us. And, if you are a leader of a likeminded church, let us help you find a family or individual to adopt. We are told by people on scene that there are hundreds, if not thousands, who would move out today –- anywhere! -– if they could be helped.

In the Beloved One,

Bob Bixby

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