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Printable Documents


message from Joy on Pastor’s behalf:

For those of you who have been having trouble printing the articles Pastor Bixby posts here, the issue seems to be an Internet browser problem. Pastor’s weblog doesn’t like to print legibly when you’re using Internet Explorer (the blue ‘e‘ way of accessing the Web).*

I have uploaded printable PDF documents of each of Pastor’s articles. There are three with which I’ve had some issues (Fundamentalist Groupthink, Part I; Shepherd’s Conference, Day I; Shepherd’s Conference, Day II), but those should be rectified issues soon, and the articles should be available for printing by the end of today. To print the articles, simply scroll to the bottom of each and click on the “| download printable PDF file |” link. This will open for you a printable document that should print legibly when you go to File > Print in your browser menu (or when you download it to your computer and open it from there).

* If you’re tired of this and other IE pains in the neck, you might want to look into installing the Firefox Internet browser from Mozilla.org. Not only does Firefox display pages attractively and print-ably, but it also has more in-built safeguards to prevent ads and self-downloading viruses. It’s free to download and install, and it will automatically import any existing bookmarks you had in IE. I highly recommend Firefox; I have used it for quite some time without the dangers and annoyances I experienced with IE.

Thanks for your patience. The longer articles should be available this evening. The others are available now.

~joy

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7 Responses

  1. * If you’re tired of this and other IE pains in the neck, you might want to look into installing the Firefox Internet browser from Mozilla.org. Not only does Firefox display pages attractively and print-ably, but it also has more in-built safeguards to prevent ads and self-downloading viruses. It’s free to download and install, and it will automatically import any existing bookmarks you had in IE. I highly recommend Firefox; I have used it for quite some time without the dangers and annoyances I experienced with IE.

    I have to call you on this. It’s true that printing support isn’t so great, this will improve down the line.. As far as security it’s a cheapshot though. Firefox doesn’t really have “built in safeguards to prevent self-downloading viruses.” It’s just not a target yet because it doesn’t have the majority of browser share. Overflow exploits are the usual route spyware vendors use to self-install. These aren’t put there by the browser vendor intentionally, rather they are an exploitation of an assumption the software developer has made in the design. It has taken a lot of evolution and re-thinking of the software engineering process to come up with designs that include security out of the box. Pre-~2000 this wasn’t so much an issue – we were all concerned about making things work and delivering a high quality end user experience out of the box. Now security comes before anything else. So the large code bases that have been around for quite a while (Netscape, IE, etc) are bound to continue to hit bumps before all the issues are ironed out. The most popular product for a given venue will always be the target. I am quite sure that if IE had not won the previous browser war, we would still be dealing with these issues today, still on the most popular product. [/rant]

    This message is provided “AS IS” with no warranties, and confers no rights. Any opinions or policies stated within are my own and do not necessarily constitute those of my employer.

  2. Ian, you’re quibbling. The fact that IE is the main target of spyware, etc. means other browsers are safer, even if they don’t have more “safeguards.” And you can’t deny that the non-IE engines used by Firefox, Opera, and Safari do a much better job rendering standards-compliant pages. Please don’t confuse the laypeople into thinking they should stick with the Pinto of browsers. 🙂

  3. I did have the [/rant]..

    The pinto of browsers is Mosaic…or even worse, lynx. Most of the pages on the internet are written for IE. Not some version of the CSS standard that hardly anyone is using. I am simply pointing out that if you push everyone to use an alternative browser, and others do as well… the spyware will just follow them there as the popularity of that browser increases. It doesn’t solve the overall problem.

  4. hey, Ian. i don’t know you, but i’m sure your perspective is valid in its own sphere. this is not my first run-in with IE, though, so i’m going to be disillusioned quite possibly for life. i know they’re coming out with new jazzy versions, and i know that they are very special people. but when your computer has been very nearly destroyed by IE’s oopsies, and when you consistently experience compatibility difficulties like this one, there comes a point where your allegiance to one browser fizzles, and you take the big leap up, up and away, never to return. =}

    i’ve never even heard of the pintos you mention, Ian; but, based upon my limited experience, i would never on the other hand tout IE as the rolls royce in comparison. so i don’t. i don’t think Firefox is a cure-all either, but my experience with Firefox has never handicapped and left my computer for dead, either…so maybe i just consider it a reliable chevy cavalier stationwagon. i drive a chevy to church. and i browse the Internet via Firefox.

    i kind of mind offending a complete stranger, but if you’re loyal to IE, you’re used to taking unpleasant stuff, so i’ll risk it. =} having worked with distance education for a software company for two years, and having had my own websites for three years, i have come to view IE users as the lowest common denominator. since it is by far the most popular browser amongst Windows users, i am forced to condescend to users’ needs. Safari has its problems for Mac users, but until the rest of the world wises up to Apple, IE is destined to be the software R&D people’s pain in the neck. it is true that we have to acknowledge and accommodate IE users, but we don’t have to like IE. love the people, not the sin. =}

    in the meanwhile, i can preach the Mozilla Firefox gospel to all, indiscriminately and hopefully.

  5. There’s nothing wrong with Lynx, Ian–it’s the beat-up old pickup that gets the job done on minimal systems. And at least Mosaic’s in museums, not still on the road. The point about standards is that they help make web designers’ lives easier; IE’s refusal to comply makes their lives harder. And if an alternate browser were to become the majority browser, I doubt it would have as many problems as IE because it’s not using ActiveX.
    My apologies to Bob whom I know hates to see his comments go off-topic. 😉

  6. No need to apologize. Since I haven’t understood one word of everything that’s been said, I have no idea of knowing whether it’s been on-topic or off!

  7. =}

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